Residency/Fellowship Programs

Stony Brook University Medical Center

Orthopaedic Surgery Residency East SetauketOrthopaedic Surgery Residency

Stony Brook Medicine, affiliated with the State University of New York (SUNY) at Stony Brook, is Suffolk County’s only tertiary care hospital and Level 1 Trauma Center, and is one of two of the only academic medical centers on Long Island. Located approximately 60 miles east of New York City, it is certified for 540 beds, employs more than 4,800 employees, and is the largest hospital in Suffolk County. Stony Brook Medicine treats approximately 30,000 inpatients, more than 250,000 outpatients, and is where more than 15,000 surgical cases are performed.  We provide advanced patient care and health education, conduct state-of-the-art research, and perform extensive community service.  Not only do we offer the latest advances in medicine, we are actively enhancing medical knowledge through basic science and clinical research.  Stony Brook Medicine is also a major teaching facility.  The medical school trains 450 students annually and there are over 540 residents and fellows working in the Hospital. 

Two members of Stony Brook Medicine were honored as recipients of the 2011 Annual Health Care Heroes Awards by Long Island Business News on 11/10/11.  They were among 42 individuals and institutions honored at the magazine’s sixth annual awards ceremony.  One of Stony Brook Medicine’s recipients, Dr.  Lawrence C. Hurst, Professor and Chairman of the Department of Orthopaedics, was one of eight recipients of the Physican Heroes awards.  Dr. Hurst, working with colleague Marie Badalamente, PhD, Professor of Orthopaedics, discovered and developed a new injectable form of the enzyme collagenese, which is used to treat Dupuytren’s contracture.  Drs. Hurst and Badalamente discovered this treatment during a 20 year research initiative and received FDA approval for the new drug treatment in 2010.  The publication’s annual awards recognize excellence, innovation, and contributions to the value and quality of health care for residents of Long Island. 

The Department of Orthopaedics’ Division of Sports Medicine has been appointed the official team physicians of the Long Island Lizards professional men’s lacrosse team.  The Lizards have been a part of the Major League Lacrosse, LLC, since its inception back in 2001.  Drs. James Penna and James Paci work together to meet the orthopaedic needs of this team, along with serving the athletes of the Stony Brook University Seawolves. 

Stony Brook Medicine has been a recipient of the National Research Corporation’s “Consumer Choice Award,” the only hospital in Suffolk County and one of only two on Long Island to receive this.  HealthGrades, a well-known independent rating company of hospitals and physicians, has awarded Stony Brook Medicine a “Distinguished Hospital Award for Clinical Excellence” in its 2009 ratings.  This ranking is achieved by only 270 (about 5%) of the 4,971 hospitals that are reviewed.  Stony Brook Medicine achieved a four star rating for Quality and Accountability by the University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC), which places Stony Brook at number 17 in the nation, compared to the 102 UHC member academic medical centers.  The National Consensus Project also announced the first recipients of the Quality in Palliative Care Leadership Award, and Stony Brook is one of nine selected to receive this award in the USA.  Three Department of Orthopaedics faculty were the recipients of the 2009 Orthopaedic Research Education Foundation (OREF) Award for Outstanding Orthopaedic Clinical Research.  This award recognized the work in the past ten years of Lawrence Hurst, MD, Marie Badalamente, PhD, and Edward Wang, MD on the use of collagenase in the treatment of Dupuytren’s contracture as well as for the treatment of frozen shoulder. 

Further, we recently celebrated the grand opening of the first phase of the Major Modernization Project.  Amidst hundreds of staff, guests, legislators, press, television cameras, the Dean of the School of Medicine, the President of the University, and the Commissioner of the New York State Department of Health, we celebrated the opening of Phase I of the Major Modernization Project (MMP), an important milestone in our history.  The MMP has created the platform for contemporary advanced care for the next several decades.  Advanced technologies will speed the transfer of information, make care safer, enhance patient privacy, and improve workflow for staff.

The Orthopaedic Surgery Residency Program provides the resident with a rich educational experience through its home institution, Stony Brook Medicine, and two affiliated hospitals, Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Winthrop University Hospital.  A rotation is also provided in Orthopaedic Oncology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, and we recently added an Orthopaedic Oncology rotation at Stony Brook. 

Rotations are provided in the subspecialties of Hand Surgery, Foot Surgery, Microsurgery, Pediatric Orthopaedics, General Orthopaedics, Spinal Surgery, Trauma, Sports Medicine/Arthroscopy, Joint Replacement and Reconstruction, Upper Extremity Surgery, and Orthopaedic Oncology.  There is uninterrupted participation in the comprehensive management of patients in all subspecialties, from initial ambulatory encounter through admission and treatment processes to rehabilitation and follow-up.  All residents at all hospitals get a balanced experience of clinical and diagnostic orthopaedics, as well as surgical management of orthopaedic problems. 

Multiple weekly conferences include Peds/Spine Conference, Peds X-ray Conference, Trauma Conference, and Hand Conference.  Also conducted on a weekly basis are Grand Rounds (which consists of case or pathology presentations one to two times a month, formal senior resident presentations once a month, faculty Grand Rounds once a month, and QA Conference once a month).  Resident Conference is held every Wednesday for three hours.  Each session includes a lecture by a resident(s), based on PGY level, or an attending, and/or laboratory exercise by all residents and attending, monthly Sports Conference, and a monthly orthopaedic pathology lecture presented by a visiting professor.  Recon Conference and Oncology Conference are held biweekly, and Ortho Tumor Board is held semimonthly.       

A completed research project of publishable quality is required of each resident prior to graduation.  Time and resources are available to the residents for required and elective research interests. 

Strong faculty commitment to teaching and academic development, combined with a full and varied surgical schedule, provides a vast amount of clinical material and support for the resident.  This results in an experience that fulfills and exceeds the requirements of the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgeons (ABOS). 

The academic resources of the program are many.  As part of Stony Brook Medicine, our residents and faculty have access to the Health Sciences Center Library which has very liberal hours of availability.  In addition, they have access to 24 hour (on or off site) online access.  The musculoskeletal e-journal offerings are quite extensive, and the Help Desk offers outstanding services with regards to acquisition of items outside the catalog.  Additionally, through a service called Softweb, our residents and faculty have free access to a huge catalog of academic software, from antivirus titles to statistics and MS Office.

The Medical School has several media integrated lecture halls, the new operating rooms are prewired for recording and conferencing capabilities, and there are two computer labs in the Health Sciences Center, whereas one is part of the Library (as above), and the other is run by Informatics for training or other services that may be required (such as taking the OITE).  The Clinical Skills Center is an advanced OSCE and skill training facility, and we have utilized the space for orthopaedic resident education for several years now.  Additionally, 2011 saw the opening of the centralized Surgical Skills Center.

Within our administrative offices, we have the resident conference room, which is fully media capable and is hard wired to the musculoskeletal lab, the resident library (with a large archive of past JBJS and CORR, computer terminals, and printer), and access to fax machines and a full service copier/collator/scanner.

The administrative offices also house Dr. Komatsu’s musculoskeletal lab, Dr. Badalamente’s lab, Microsurgical Skills Lab with fully functional microscopes, both standard and trainer/dual scopes, instruments and suture materials.  The Wet-Dry Surgical Skills Lab is a fully functional surgical demo and modeling area used for research, anatomic dissections, and surgical practice and skill testing.  Additionally, all lab activity can be recorded and viewed live via direct communication with the resident conference room.

Educational activity, including the Orthopaedic Cellular Biology/Structure Lab and Musculoskeletal Lab, provide basic research experience.  Instruction in cellular physiology and biochemistry of musculoskeletal tissues (bone/cartilage; muscle/nerve; tendon/ligament) is given by the Ph.D. faculty of the Orthopaedic Department.  Our research scientists help to facilitate the development of collaborative and independent research initiatives.  Pathology is taught by the clinical faculty and supplemented by monthly lectures by a visiting professor.  Anatomy is taught on a regular basis, both in the operating room and the lab.  Cross-sectional anatomy is taught in combination with radiodiagnostic techniques such as CT and MRI, both for the extremities and spine.  Psychomotor skills are taught in a preliminary physical exam and psychomotor course that is given annually to entry-level (PGY-2) residents.  Periodically throughout the year, psychomotor skills are refined through hands-on experience in the Micro Lab, suturing vessels, tendons and nerves.  A trauma-oriented skill section is also included, and offers experience with procedures such as internal fixation for wrist fractures and AO techniques in trauma. 

Stony Brook Medicine, affiliated with the State University of New York (SUNY) at Stony Brook, is Suffolk County’s only tertiary care hospital and Level 1 Trauma Center, and is one of two of the only academic medical centers on Long Island. Located approximately 60 miles east of New York City, it is certified for 540 beds, employs more than 4,800 employees, and is the largest hospital in Suffolk County. Stony Brook Medicine treats approximately 30,000 inpatients, more than 250,000 outpatients, and is where more than 15,000 surgical cases are performed.  We provide advanced patient care and health education, conduct state-of-the-art research, and perform extensive community service.  Not only do we offer the latest advances in medicine, we are actively enhancing medical knowledge through basic science and clinical research.  Stony Brook Medicine is also a major teaching facility.  The medical school trains 450 students annually and there are over 540 residents and fellows working in the Hospital. 

 

Two members of Stony Brook Medicine were honored as recipients of the 2011 Annual Health Care Heroes Awards by Long Island Business News on 11/10/11.  They were among 42 individuals and institutions honored at the magazine’s sixth annual awards ceremony.  One of Stony Brook Medicine’s recipients, Dr.  Lawrence C. Hurst, Professor and Chairman of the Department of Orthopaedics, was one of eight recipients of the Physican Heroes awards.  Dr. Hurst, working with colleague Marie Badalamente, PhD, Professor of Orthopaedics, discovered and developed a new injectable form of the enzyme collagenese, which is used to treat Dupuytren’s contracture.  Drs. Hurst and Badalamente discovered this treatment during a 20 year research initiative and received FDA approval for the new drug treatment in 2010.  The publication’s annual awards recognize excellence, innovation, and contributions to the value and quality of health care for residents of Long Island. 

 

The Department of Orthopaedics’ Division of Sports Medicine has been appointed the official team physicians of the Long Island Lizards professional men’s lacrosse team.  The Lizards have been a part of the Major League Lacrosse, LLC, since its inception back in 2001.  Drs. James Penna and James Paci work together to meet the orthopaedic needs of this team, along with serving the athletes of the Stony Brook University Seawolves. 

 

Stony Brook Medicine has been a recipient of the National Research Corporation’s “Consumer Choice Award,” the only hospital in Suffolk County and one of only two on Long Island to receive this.  HealthGrades, a well-known independent rating company of hospitals and physicians, has awarded Stony Brook Medicine a “Distinguished Hospital Award for Clinical Excellence” in its 2009 ratings.  This ranking is achieved by only 270 (about 5%) of the 4,971 hospitals that are reviewed.  Stony Brook Medicine achieved a four star rating for Quality and Accountability by the University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC), which places Stony Brook at number 17 in the nation, compared to the 102 UHC member academic medical centers.  The National Consensus Project also announced the first recipients of the Quality in Palliative Care Leadership Award, and Stony Brook is one of nine selected to receive this award in the USA.  Three Department of Orthopaedics faculty were the recipients of the 2009 Orthopaedic Research Education Foundation (OREF) Award for Outstanding Orthopaedic Clinical Research.  This award recognized the work in the past ten years of Lawrence Hurst, MD, Marie Badalamente, PhD, and Edward Wang, MD on the use of collagenase in the treatment of Dupuytren’s contracture as well as for the treatment of frozen shoulder. 

 

Further, we recently celebrated the grand opening of the first phase of the Major Modernization Project.  Amidst hundreds of staff, guests, legislators, press, television cameras, the Dean of the School of Medicine, the President of the University, and the Commissioner of the New York State Department of Health, we celebrated the opening of Phase I of the Major Modernization Project (MMP), an important milestone in our history.  The MMP has created the platform for contemporary advanced care for the next several decades.  Advanced technologies will speed the transfer of information, make care safer, enhance patient privacy, and improve workflow for staff.

 

The Orthopaedic Surgery Residency Program provides the resident with a rich educational experience through its home institution, Stony Brook Medicine, and two affiliated hospitals, Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Winthrop University Hospital.  A rotation is also provided in Orthopaedic Oncology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, and we recently added an Orthopaedic Oncology rotation at Stony Brook. 

 

Rotations are provided in the subspecialties of Hand Surgery, Foot Surgery, Microsurgery, Pediatric Orthopaedics, General Orthopaedics, Spinal Surgery, Trauma, Sports Medicine/Arthroscopy, Joint Replacement and Reconstruction, Upper Extremity Surgery, and Orthopaedic Oncology.  There is uninterrupted participation in the comprehensive management of patients in all subspecialties, from initial ambulatory encounter through admission and treatment processes to rehabilitation and follow-up.  All residents at all hospitals get a balanced experience of clinical and diagnostic orthopaedics, as well as surgical management of orthopaedic problems. 

 

Multiple weekly conferences include Peds/Spine Conference, Peds X-ray Conference, Trauma Conference, and Hand Conference.  Also conducted on a weekly basis are Grand Rounds (which consists of case or pathology presentations one to two times a month, formal senior resident presentations once a month, faculty Grand Rounds once a month, and QA Conference once a month).  Resident Conference is held every Wednesday for three hours.  Each session includes a lecture by a resident(s), based on PGY level, or an attending, and/or laboratory exercise by all residents and attending, monthly Sports Conference, and a monthly orthopaedic pathology lecture presented by a visiting professor.  Recon Conference and Oncology Conference are held biweekly, and Ortho Tumor Board is held semimonthly.       

 

A completed research project of publishable quality is required of each resident prior to graduation.  Time and resources are available to the residents for required and elective research interests. 

 

Strong faculty commitment to teaching and academic development, combined with a full and varied surgical schedule, provides a vast amount of clinical material and support for the resident.  This results in an experience that fulfills and exceeds the requirements of the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgeons (ABOS). 

 

The academic resources of the program are many.  As part of Stony Brook Medicine, our residents and faculty have access to the Health Sciences Center Library which has very liberal hours of availability.  In addition, they have access to 24 hour (on or off site) online access.  The musculoskeletal e-journal offerings are quite extensive, and the Help Desk offers outstanding services with regards to acquisition of items outside the catalog.  Additionally, through a service called Softweb, our residents and faculty have free access to a huge catalog of academic software, from antivirus titles to statistics and MS Office.

 

The Medical School has several media integrated lecture halls, the new operating rooms are prewired for recording and conferencing capabilities, and there are two computer labs in the Health Sciences Center, whereas one is part of the Library (as above), and the other is run by Informatics for training or other services that may be required (such as taking the OITE).  The Clinical Skills Center is an advanced OSCE and skill training facility, and we have utilized the space for orthopaedic resident education for several years now.  Additionally, 2011 saw the opening of the centralized Surgical Skills Center.

 

Within our administrative offices, we have the resident conference room, which is fully media capable and is hard wired to the musculoskeletal lab, the resident library (with a large archive of past JBJS and CORR, computer terminals, and printer), and access to fax machines and a full service copier/collator/scanner.

 

The administrative offices also house Dr. Komatsu’s musculoskeletal lab, Dr. Badalamente’s lab, Microsurgical Skills Lab with fully functional microscopes, both standard and trainer/dual scopes, instruments and suture materials.  The Wet-Dry Surgical Skills Lab is a fully functional surgical demo and modeling area used for research, anatomic dissections, and surgical practice and skill testing.  Additionally, all lab activity can be recorded and viewed live via direct communication with the resident conference room.

 

Educational activity, including the Orthopaedic Cellular Biology/Structure Lab and Musculoskeletal Lab, provide basic research experience.  Instruction in cellular physiology and biochemistry of musculoskeletal tissues (bone/cartilage; muscle/nerve; tendon/ligament) is given by the Ph.D. faculty of the Orthopaedic Department.  Our research scientists help to facilitate the development of collaborative and independent research initiatives.  Pathology is taught by the clinical faculty and supplemented by monthly lectures by a visiting professor.  Anatomy is taught on a regular basis, both in the operating room and the lab.  Cross-sectional anatomy is taught in combination with radiodiagnostic techniques such as CT and MRI, both for the extremities and spine.  Psychomotor skills are taught in a preliminary physical exam and psychomotor course that is given annually to entry-level (PGY-2) residents.  Periodically throughout the year, psychomotor skills are refined through hands-on experience in the Micro Lab, suturing vessels, tendons and nerves.  A trauma-oriented skill section is also included, and offers experience with procedures such as internal fixation for wrist fractures and AO techniques in trauma.

Application Process

Medical students apply to the Residency Program in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Stony Brook University Medical Center by utilizing the Electronic Residency Application System (ERAS), which is overseen by the AAMC.  Medical students file applications electronically at their own medical schools.  The materials listed below are required to complete your application file:

  • Common Application Form (CAF)
  • Personal Statement
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Dean’s Letter
  • Medical School Transcript
  • Three (3) Letters of Recommendation
  • Part I (and Part II if available) Board Score(s)
  • Photo

Our deadline to receive completed applications is October 1st.  Completed applications are evaluated by the Chairman and Program Director and their appointed committee, consisting of Orthopaedic physicians from Stony Brook University Medical Center and our affiliating institutions.  Qualified individuals are invited to attend one of the interview sessions, which are held in December.  Each candidate is interviewed by several groups of physicians (consisting of two to three physicians within each group), followed by an interview with the Chairman of the department.  Candidates are shown a virtual tour slide presentation, and our residents are available to speak with and answer questions.  Each candidate is ranked, and the names are submitted to the NRMP (National Resident Matching Program).  Upon completion of the match in March, the department is notified of the residents who have matched into our program.  Residents entering the program must sign a contract and a letter of agreement.

Stony Brook University Orthopaedic Residency Program Brochure